Home Health Care in Glendale AZ: What Equipment Will You Need to Care for a Stroke Victim at Home?Every two minutes, three people in the U.S. have a stroke. In half of the men and women who survive a stroke, long-term mobility issues are the norm. If your parent has a stroke, care from a family member or professional home care provider is essential.

After a stroke, you will need to make changes at your parent’s house. Here are some of the things you will need to add before your parent arrives home from the hospital or nursing home where rehabilitation takes place.

Wheelchair or Walker Safety

Mobility is likely to be impacted. If your mom or dad will need a wheelchair, you’ll have to see if doorways are wide enough for a wheelchair. If not, call your area’s Agency on Aging to ask about contractors and grant programs, if available, that can help make your parent’s house safer.

It may be that there is no way to make their house ADA-compliant. If this is the case, you may have to seriously consider downsizing to a one-level home that is equipped for wheelchair use.

If your mom or dad will need a walker, it may be easier. A stair lift is likely going to be necessary if bedrooms are on an upper floor. If they cannot afford a stair lift, see if you can convert a room on the lower level into a bedroom. A home care agency can also help you look into the different conversions that may be needed.

Bathroom Safety

Standing for an extended period of time is a problem after a stroke. A shower seat is necessary. Check that the seat you’re looking at can hold your mom or dad’s weight. Handles can help your parent transfer from a shower to a wheelchair and vice versa.

The bathtub or shower wall and wall outside of the shower or tub must have a grab bar for safety. You also want to install grab bars to the side of the toilet. If that’s not possible, purchase toilet safety rails for each toilet in the home.

Equipment for Other Rooms in the Home

Clear the bedroom floor of any unnecessary furniture. You should also put in a rail that offers support while getting in and out of the bed.

In the dining room, your mom or dad may struggle to hold onto utensils and pick up foods when eating. Plates that have dividers to keep foods from sliding around too much will help. Look for utensils that have wide grips that make them easier to hold. Cups should have two handles to keep liquids from spilling.

Talk to a home care agency about other changes you can make at your parent’s home. Your parent may be frustrated and want to do things independently. Let your mom or dad do as much on their own as possible. Hire a caregiver to help with the rest.

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/facts.htm

IF YOU OR AN AGING LOVED-ONE ARE CONSIDERING HOME HEALTH CARE IN GLENDALE, AZ, CONTACT THE CARING STAFF AT GOLDEN HEART SENIOR CARE. CALL TODAY (623) 748-3301.